At Prada simplicity is back

“The feeling in today’s world is that everything is too much. Overproduction, overconsumption, overspeed. This makes a harsh contrast with the need we have to consume and pollute less,” explained Miuccia Prada before the show wearing a beautiful and very bourgeoise outfit: a blue cashmere pullover, long pearl necklaces, white slip dress, and black polished décolletées. “It’s the contradiction of the days we are living in. Of course, fashion cannot change the world but if everyone will do their small part, something will start to change for sure.” This introduction led to the beautiful collection where Prada was Prada in its signature conceptual approach with classic touches mixed with crazy yet controlled bites. “This time I didn’t do minimalism, but I went as simple as possible,” she said. So, finally she went back to the roots that made her the master of fashion, grounded in culture, ideas, politics, substance, and not just surface value or showing off.

Kid mohair wool and row silk gauze with a rough look were the fil rouge in terms of fabrics of the collection: tailleur with slightly seventies touches, jackets and light coats were counterposed with light silk dresses. There was also her signature micro design on suits and beautiful knitwear outfits. The only decorations were the fern leaves embroidered here and there and some gold touches. This collection was a strong statement for the house, a kind of reset to erase what Prada has become in recent years. It was made with guts, and in a time where everybody is adding, she decided to subtract by going back to the beauty of simplicity. “I put my attention on style instead of fashion itself, even if I’m a woman fully in love with it,” the designer explained. “Everyone has his own personality and he can interpret the clothes as he likes, so I try to express every different woman with every single look.” And this is very Prada.
 
“The Sixties psychedelia and the Vienna Secession were the starting point of the collection,” explained Lucie and Luke Meier backstage. The center of the venue, the Milanese art school Accademia di Brera, displayed an installation made with cones of white gravel that amplified the surreal atmosphere in between a zen garden and a lunar landscape. “It could seem that psychedelia doesn’t fit with the brand, but for us it’s a state of mind more than printed patterns. Also the location we chose for the show is the place where the next generation’s culture might come from.” In the show the aesthetic contrast was beautiful: a rebellious state of mind in rigorous clothing. The soundtrack deeply emphasized the psychedelic mood featuring the famous Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” and “Today” and Ultimate Spinach’s “Hip Death Goddess” among other songs. A lot of white, navy blue, and natural linen and silks made all looks pure, clean, and balanced. Tailoring and draping defined the silhouette that was sometimes structured, sometimes very fluid and fluctuating.

The glamourous safari meets Seventies hippy girls at Alberta Ferretti. “In the last season, I decided to move more to the daywear where I like to experiment and try new ways, but I want to be clear that, to me, it’s different from the streetwear. Some pieces of the collection are a bit more sporty, but never too much,” explained the designer before the show. “Identity and character are the DNA of my woman.” Touches of animalier prints that turned optical, but without forgetting the feminine touch. Tie-dye denim overalls and patchworks tops, skirts, and bell bottomed pants have a strong seventies touch keeping the romantic allure of Alberta Ferretti. “My story started with the long and feminine chiffon dresses that I wanted to keep,” so the whole evening was inspired by the deep blue and black of the night sea; the gowns are light and sparkling with precious embroideries.

Alessandro Dell’Acqua at N.21 explored the erotic side of femininity. “I feel that today we are afraid to talk about this topic,” explained the designer backstage. “So I wanted to show bare skin in order to unveil a pinch of sensuality. Nowadays the world is too restrained to express their sensuality, but, in reverse, it’s important to free this feeling. There is too much prudery.” In the coed collection, both women and men were sensual, sometimes playful and sometimes sexy. The sleeves were slashed in order to show the bare arms, the backs of beautiful long dresses were naked and the see-through chiffon was a symbol of this mood together with the fluidity of the silhouette. Dell’Acqua worked with women’s sensuality, something that he knows very well and has become a signature touch since he started, one that he is perfecting season by season.

Calcaterra dug into the emotions, proposing an ethereal woman with a delicate masculinity that emphasizes her grace. The volumes have been exaggerated in oversized jackets that framed the slender silhouette underneath. “This collection shows my need to take a deep breath, and stimulates all the senses like touch, hearing, and sight. To show it I worked on my shapes and I made them even more wide,” explained Daniele Calcaterra backstage. “I loved the idea of growing and expanding the figure using a lot of fabrics in layers or jackets that become dresses. But in juxtaposition I used only four colours: white, black, kaki, and red.” This approach, mixed with Japanese and fleming-inspired elements, turned the collection into a very sophisticated ensemble which, this season, injected more energy to the minimal signature style of the Milanese designer.


Arthur Arbesser explored another personal point of view: “The world of fashion is so full of product so my only way to be different is to tell my personal stories,” explained the designer. “So this season I want to talk about my grandmother who was born in Transylvania. Her life was very complicated but everything was framed by romantic memories.” A few months ago, Arbesser discovered his grandmother’s archive of fabrics spanning from the 20s to the 80s, so from here everything started. The patch-working of these old fabrics was one of the topics of the collection, together with cute flower blueprints that recalled the Transylvanian ceramics.


For its Milanese debut, Peter Pilotto was fascinated by the Italian light. “Coming into town meant discovering a bit of our roots,” explained the creative duo Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos backstage. “We have a strong link with Italy for our production and fabrics, so we wanted to feel more at home. The intensity of the sun is so strong and the impact with colour is very powerful, so we wanted to put this solar optimism on dresses with floral prints over everything.” Draped dresses, asymmetric skirts, pajamas, shirts, and the engineered knit mixed with lurex were all colourful and maybe even too flashy. Actually. an overall look at the full collection clearly gave the happy and summery message, but it was too loud and lacking style direction.



SHARE
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
SIMILAR ARTICLES
How to Lose Followers
By Aarushi Saxena
Disingenuous endorsements is the number one reason why individuals unfollow influencers,...
By Aarushi Saxena
By Aarushi Saxena
Disingenuous endorsements is the number one reason why individuals unfollow influencers, according to Instagram creative firm Takumi and a study released last week by Marketing Charts, a hub for data, graphics, and research analysis. Based on a survey of 2,251 representatives in the UK, the US,...
Disingenuous endorsements is the number one reason why individuals unfollow influencers, according to Instagram creative firm Takumi and a study released last week by Marketing Charts, a hub for data, graphics, and research analysis. Based on a survey of 2,251 representatives in the UK, the US, and Germany, a significant crowd of 16- to 24-year-old consumers credit influencers for their “trendy...
The Kimono Reinvented
By Elisabeta Tudor
The kimono has always been an object of fascination. Even in Japan, where it is considered an...
By Elisabeta Tudor
By Elisabeta Tudor
The kimono has always been an object of fascination. Even in Japan, where it is considered an intangible cultural treasure, designers can’t help but put their hands on it to reinvent it and challenge traditional perception.Yoshiki Hayashi, an influential composer and musician-turned-designer, did...
The kimono has always been an object of fascination. Even in Japan, where it is considered an intangible cultural treasure, designers can’t help but put their hands on it to reinvent it and challenge traditional perception.Yoshiki Hayashi, an influential composer and musician-turned-designer, did just that during the latest week of runway shows in Tokyo. As of today, the best-selling artist –...
The Forgotten Side of Fashion
By Frédéric Martin-Bernard
In our current times that are defined by social media and selfies, it is not uncommon for fashion...
By Frédéric Martin-Bernard
By Frédéric Martin-Bernard
In our current times that are defined by social media and selfies, it is not uncommon for fashion designers to solely focus on the front sides of the garments they design. Is this a reflection of our current digitally-obsessed era, or does this tendency reveal a decline of true craftsmanship?The...
In our current times that are defined by social media and selfies, it is not uncommon for fashion designers to solely focus on the front sides of the garments they design. Is this a reflection of our current digitally-obsessed era, or does this tendency reveal a decline of true craftsmanship?The contrast was striking. On September 25th, Anrealage’s Creative Director Kunihiko Morinaga chose to...
Chloé and UNICEF to Empower Young Women
By NOWFASHION
The French luxury Maison under the creative direction of Natacha Ramsay-Levi and UNICEF just...
By NOWFASHION
The French luxury Maison under the creative direction of Natacha Ramsay-Levi and UNICEF just announced a new 3-year global partnership to advance gender equality through innovative tech solutions developed with and for adolescent girls.The partnership will include support to flagship UNICEF...
The French luxury Maison under the creative direction of Natacha Ramsay-Levi and UNICEF just announced a new 3-year global partnership to advance gender equality through innovative tech solutions developed with and for adolescent girls.The partnership will include support to flagship UNICEF programming models that equip adolescent girls and young women from Bolivia, Jordan, Morocco, Senegal,...
The Show Goes on in São Paulo
By Jorge Grimberg
“Brazilian creatives have gone through a whirlwind following the dramatic political scandals of...
By Jorge Grimberg
By Jorge Grimberg
“Brazilian creatives have gone through a whirlwind following the dramatic political scandals of the past few years and throughout this scenario, SPFW has become a tool to keep the system alive,” said Paulo Borges, the CEO and founder of São Paulo Fashion Week, which will close its 48th edition on...
“Brazilian creatives have gone through a whirlwind following the dramatic political scandals of the past few years and throughout this scenario, SPFW has become a tool to keep the system alive,” said Paulo Borges, the CEO and founder of São Paulo Fashion Week, which will close its 48th edition on Friday. A visionary ahead of his time, Borges started São Paulo Fashion Week 24 years ago. The...
Shanghai: Tech and Tribal Culture
By Jing Zhang
In a swish of Balenciaga jumpers, Gucci tees, and doll-like Chinese KOLs live streaming to their...
By Jing Zhang
In a swish of Balenciaga jumpers, Gucci tees, and doll-like Chinese KOLs live streaming to their fans on their phones, Shanghai Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2020 is coming to a close. It was a week of sunshine, rainstorms, and blustering winds, as buyers, media, and fashionistas traversed between...
In a swish of Balenciaga jumpers, Gucci tees, and doll-like Chinese KOLs live streaming to their fans on their phones, Shanghai Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2020 is coming to a close. It was a week of sunshine, rainstorms, and blustering winds, as buyers, media, and fashionistas traversed between Xintiandi (home to shows on the main official schedule) and the Labelhood runway platform – this time...
How Shanghai Could Change Fashion
By Gianluca Cantaro
When you are in Shanghai, the only thing you need to worry about is always keeping your phone...
By Gianluca Cantaro
By Gianluca Cantaro
When you are in Shanghai, the only thing you need to worry about is always keeping your phone charged and connected – as everything passes through these devices, and without it you are lost. Cash no longer circulates; the QR code pays everything. This, of course, offers more control on...
When you are in Shanghai, the only thing you need to worry about is always keeping your phone charged and connected – as everything passes through these devices, and without it you are lost. Cash no longer circulates; the QR code pays everything. This, of course, offers more control on transactions and, I guess, fewer tax evasion problems (at least for shopping). This is one aspect of the...
Lindbergh Film to Premiere in Milan
By Sofia Celeste
Milan’s Fashion Film Festival will unveil “Peter Lindbergh: Women’s Stories” at Milan’s Anteo...
By Sofia Celeste
Milan’s Fashion Film Festival will unveil “Peter Lindbergh: Women’s Stories” at Milan’s Anteo Cinema on November 10th.“Engaging and intimate, this film depicts the German photographer and features Naomi Campbell, [his wife] Astrid Lindbergh, and Helga Polzin,” organizers said Tuesday.The...
Milan’s Fashion Film Festival will unveil “Peter Lindbergh: Women’s Stories” at Milan’s Anteo Cinema on November 10th.“Engaging and intimate, this film depicts the German photographer and features Naomi Campbell, [his wife] Astrid Lindbergh, and Helga Polzin,” organizers said Tuesday.The Lindbergh documentary was directed by Jean-Michel Vecchiet, who also depicted the life of Jean-Michel...