Digital Up-cycling with Morphine.Online

What makes an e-commerce platform stand out nowadays? As the number of digital platforms selling clothing online increases exponentially, finding a way to emerge from the crowd is becoming progressively difficult.

From The Real Real to Vestiare Collective and more, the fashion resale market has been thriving and as ThredUp’s 2019 Resale Report states, it is predicted to grow to nearly one point five per cent more than fast fashion by 2028.

Founded in 2018, Morphine.online is the first platform dedicated to conscious consumerism. Since its inception, and fueled by an uptick in second-hand clothing, the company is now ready to release its second drop of up-cycled garments, the founders, creative director and consultant Macs Iotti, Tommaso Vaiani and Martina Iotti, said Wednesday.

Taking its name from the VIP area of the famous Italian club Cocoricò, a place where the creative vibe was strongly individualistic, Morphine’s aim is to become the next digital shopping space for the purchase and exploration of unique pieces.

“From the beginning we tried to give voice to our true passion,” said Macs Iotti, when asked about the inception of the project.

The website is divided into two sections: one focusing on providing a highly curated selection of vintage pieces from the wardrobes of a series of creative visionaries, while the second section will launch a series of drops of one-of-a-kind upcycled recreations.

Although the idea of launching a digital creative space that sells vintage and sustainable clothing isn’t a novelty, the notion of making sure this project acts as a catalyst for communal creation is.

“We want to demonstrate to the public and the industry that it is indeed possible to create with a different modus operandi,” said Tommaso Vaiani.

Collaborating with a variety of different creatives and turning the project into a communitarian effort is important to the trio, as their ultimate aim is to turn the website into a place where all designers and brands who share their same vision can sell their creations.

Surely, this is evident on their Instagram profile, which doubles as an editorial platform for friends, artists, photographers, personalities, students who, with total artistic freedom, have been interpreting the seven points of their manifesto online.

Their one-of-a-kind up-cycled pieces are a testament to sustainability’s place in the world of high fashion. The trio initially started infusing their flair onto existing jacquard knits.

The founding team eventually joined forces with a group of women based in the region of Emilia Romagna, who helped them cut the materials and assemble them, using a hand-crochet based technique that incorporates leftover yarn offcuts from a knitwear factory.

And as every material used followed the principles of up-cycling, it not only gave new life to sweaters and hoodies but also produced new, unique accessories out of it, such as hats and scarves.

“All the fabrics used come from deadstock and everything is produced in Italy,” said Martina Iotti. “Italy has been an enormous resource for our project because we are all aware of how much know-how and how much-skilled workforce our little country can offer.”

Certainly, as the project progresses, this partnership with local enterprises will both be helpful for the creation of items which require time for research and production, something that the contemporary fast-fashion product lacks.

Morphine will also unfurl more limited-edition drops of wardrobe essentials and is experimenting with other areas of product design and furnishings.

“But above all, we are also working in collaboration with designers and brands who are willing to work in the same regard and share a similar mindset,” concluded Macs Iotti.

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