Milano Day 5: Milano is Moving On

The Dolce & Gabbana show virtually closed the Milano Fashion Week, even if the last show is technically scheduled for Monday the 25th at 10.30 with Portuguese designer Alexandra Moura, along with the night event to celebrate the young talents and to look to the future of Italian fashion. The duo showed a long collection that showcased all their classics of timeless elegance. It was a kind of catalogue of the house’s bests: the impeccable men’s tailoring for women both for the dreamy evening Visconti’s “Il Gattopardo” movie style looks and for the daywear where the masculine fabrics were shaped on the women’s bodies; sensual see-through babydolls and nighties with fluffy furry hems; flowers in every shape, both printed and embroidered; the bold colour block outfits; the vanity inspiring animalier prints in every form; the collage technique applied to dresses with De Chirico-esque images that celebrate the Italian “fatto a mano” (handmade); the beautiful brides, the sequins in gold and every possible hue, the precious brocade in every kind of shape, and the “Sicilia” signature black of the brand. Everything was opulent – as always, the same script, but the extraordinary skills in craftmanship and the less decorated looks are certainly what make a Dolce & Gabbana collection unique.

 


Dolce & Gabbana Fall/Winter 2019 show in Milan. Photo by Alessandro Garofalo for NOWFASHION.

Earlier, Antonio Marras paid a tribute to painter Amedeo Modigliani who, at a young age, lived in Sardinia (the same Italian region where Marras comes from). He lived on the island due to his father’s mining activity. The designer imagined how people dressed up in their Sunday best, attending the festivities with clothing inherited from the older components of the family. Every look is a patchwork of many clothing items, a step back to the classic Marras looks, maybe a little bit outdated. The performance, more than a classic show, was beautiful and dramatic with actors playing live; but, unfortunately, the collection was a little bit too repetitive.

 


Act Nº 1 Fall/Winter 2019 show in Milan. Photo by Regis Colin Berthelier for NOWFASHION.


The nearly completed Milano Fashion Week marked an interesting step forward in terms of quality and style identity. The calendar is still too compressed in 4 days, even if it says 6, and doesn’t allow attendees to enjoy the possibility of discovering small and upcoming brands or presentations that were there and deserve to be more in the spotlight. Two such brands come to mind, the first of which was Moda Povera by Olivier Saillard that turned t-shirts into precious pieces with meticulous draperies that drain the ordinary out of this daily garment and wandered into the territory of very high fashion. The second to be noted was Act nº 1, founded by duo Galib Gassanoff and Luca Lin in 2016 in Reggio Emilia. Their collection brought the audience into the most secret and secluded place: our bedrooms. Delicate watercolor images printed on robes, which were contaminated by the 90s aesthetics, patent and tulle, plastic and silk, and the brand’s iconic coupled pieces like bomber\coat combos, for example, created a clash of two different worlds and cultures. The two respectively hailing from Azerbaijan and China are the perfect example of how Milano (and Italy) are embracing new cultures.



Stella Jean Fall/Winter 2019 show in Milan. Photos by Gio Staiano for NOWFASHION.

The strong debate about inclusivity became a very hot topic in days when the recent article published by the New York Times, with the interview of African-American designer Edward Buchanan, is pointing a finger at Milano saying that there is not enough diversity in the schedule and system. Also, Haitian-Italian designer Stella Jean is featured in the article participating in the debate. Actually, even if it agreed that the diversity numbers are small, the newspaper is missing two very important points. First, Italy is not a multiracial country like the United States, the U.K., or France, to mention few, for historical reasons (not for a precise choice) that cannot be questioned. Immigration in Italy was different and lesser, compared to other countries; so integration, too, was different. Also, Carlo Capasa, president of Camera Nazionale della Moda, said that our country has an extremely homogenous population. Only in these last years has Italy started to face a different and bigger wave of immigration, but the percentage of non-Italian people is still very low. On the other hand, we need to talk about talent that is a rare gift that has no color, gender, or race. So, considering what was said before, among such a small percentage of people, it’s extremely difficult to find a lot of really gifted individuals. It’s surprising how such a prominent newspaper ignores the history of our nation, relating everything with the domestic standard. But instead of mudsling our system, it would have been more interesting to feel the new Italian wave. The shows of these days underlined a sophisticated look that reflects back on the 80s splendor of the city, but in a modern and upscaled way. A rich lady with a strong sense of style, deeply rooted in the Italian tradition but with an international flair. Effortless and cool, that dress only with precious yarns, fabrics, and leather. Watching all the shows, this beautiful lady took shape; even keeping each designer’s identity, but gaining an overall and precise style. If this is a new beginning, Milano will be back stronger than ever.


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